Thiamin

Vitamin B 1 is also known as thiamine, thiamin and aneurin.   Although it can be labeled as any of the three names, thiamine is the most commonly accepted name for the vitamin. This vitamin plays a vital role in nerve function. The puzzling part, however, is that researchers have not been able to discover exactly what that role is. We do know that it helps you maintain your energy supplies, helps coordinate the activity of your nerves and muscles, and it helps support proper heart function.

Thiamine deficient individuals usually display certain symptoms or experience certain problems. It can manifest itself in weight loss, cardiac problems, and neuromuscular problems. Beri-Beri or Kakke is the name for the serious condition of severe thiamine deficiency in humans. It is characterized by loss of appetite, itching, burning, muscle weakness, and foot and wrist droop.

If you are low on thiamin, you would experience less pronounced symptoms that might indicate a need to increase your thiamine consumption. Among these symptoms are loss of appetite, prickling sensation in skin, numbness, or muscle aches.

If you are looking to increase your intake of thiamin, you should eat foods such as asparagus, mushrooms, tuna, sunflower seeds, tomatoes, eggplant, or Brussels sprouts.

Don't worry about overindulging in foods high in thiamine. Even at extremely high doses, the foods don't seem to carry a risk of toxicity.

What are the benefits of thiamin?

Some ideas about the benefits of thiamine are still being uncovered. The vitamin has been said to be linked with treatments of the following diseases:

  • Crohn's disease
  • Alcoholism
  • Alzheimer's disease
  • Congestive heart failure
  • Depression
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Epilepsy
  • Fibromyalgiaa
  • Multiple sclerosis

Those interested in adding more thiamin to their diets should feel free to do so. The benefits appear to be numerous and the risk non-existent. Most of the foods that are rich in the vitamin are also natural, healthy foods. Eat more of the foods listed above, or if you don't find that possible, you can take a dietary supplement of thiamin. You really have nothing to lose and much to gain.

 

Vitamins

Vitamin A
B-Complex Vitamins
Vitamin B 6
Vitamin B 12
Vitamin B 17
Vitamin C
Vitamin D
Vitamin E
Biotin
Choline
Niacin
Pantothenic Acid
Thiamin

Minerals

Minerals: An Overview
Copper
Chromium
Selenium
Magnesium
Vanadium
Zinc
Potassium
Iron

Supplements

Amino Acids
Antioxidants
Lutein
Lycopene
Co-Q10
Glucosamine