Getting Your Daily Dose of Thiamin From Sunflower Seeds

Thiamin was the first vitamin discovered in the world famous B complex family. Other B complexes include vitamin B2 and vitamin B12. The B family complex is a group of eight water-soluble vitamins. The family of vitamins plays a big part in breaking down fats and protein. With a main function of providing energy while the body undergoes it's glucose process.



The thiamin vitamin is an active ingredient in sunflower seeds-and it's a good thing. Thiamin helps protect the bodies' nerves and brain, in addition to the skin and digestive system. The body can suffer debilitating deficiencies without it-and we aren’t talking runny noses and snuffles.

Thiamin and Sunflower Seeds

It's true, it's true. All of those sunflower seeds that you throw back as a kid may have actually been good for you. The horror! Sunflower seed certainly wouldn't have been nearly as popular with the neighborhood tikes had they known they were eating something that Mom wouldn't shriek over. Want to know what make those little seeds so darn popular, besides the seasoning, of course?  In a word, thiamin.

The thiamin vitamin is an active ingredient in sunflower seeds-and it's a good thing. Thiamin helps protect the bodies' nerves and brain, in addition to the skin and digestive system. The body can suffer debilitating deficiencies without it-and we aren’t talking runny noses and snuffles. Just what is thiamin?

What's Thiamin?

Thiamin was the first vitamin discovered in the world famous B complex family. Other B complexes include vitamin B2 and vitamin B12. The B family complex is a group of eight water-soluble vitamins. The family of vitamins plays a big part in breaking down fats and protein. With a main function of providing energy while the body undergoes it's glucose process.

Thiamin adds with the metabolism of fats and many proteins. Vitamin B is good for healthy hair, skin, eyes, and liver. B vitamins end up being very useful as part of a balanced diet. And thiamin is no different. Thiamin helps with the maintenance of muscle tissue. And although not confirmed, studies show that thiamin may be helpful in reducing motion sickness.

Thiamin In What You Eat

If you never fancied sucking and spitting the shells of sunflower seeds all over your Dad's lawn growing up, or if you flat out don't like sunflower seeds, have no fear. There are a few games in town when it comes to getting thiamin- the recommended daily dosage is just between 1.4-50 mg. Peanuts, wheat bran, beef liver, pork, seafood, egg-yolk and beans are all great sources for thiamin-next to sunflower seeds, of course.

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